Sprinter Kemar Bailey-Cole shuns Glen Mills, cites neglect

By June 27, 2019

Oft-injured sprinter Kemar Bailey-Cole is the latest athlete to break ties with the Racers Track Club head coach Glen Mills, citing neglect.

He will remain with Racers but will work with another coach at the club.

Bailey-Cole joins Yohan Blake, Warren Weir, Jevaughn Minzie, Senoj-Jay Givans and Michael O’Hara as athletes who have either left the club or distanced themselves from the head coach in the last year.

“Effective immediately, I hereby announce that I have decided to return to my former Coach Gregory Little of Racers Track Club,” Bailey-Cole said in a statement on Thursday.

He said much of the success he has experienced in his career has been under the guidance of Little.

“Little was responsible for my progression as an athlete with steady sub-10 clockings on the circuit from the start of my career in 2010 until the start of 2014,” he said.

“My last five seasons, on and off, have been under the tutelage of Racers Head Coach Glen Mills. I would like to thank Mr Mills for his work to date.

“My decision came after careful deliberation on my progress over the past five seasons, notwithstanding injuries. I look forward to working through my latest injury and getting my career back on track.”

Returning to the track after a long break, the 2014 Commonwealth Games champion said his decision is being supported by his former club mates who have since moved on to other clubs or coaches. 

“I am overwhelmed by the support from my former training partners who have also sought other coaches over the past few months and who continue to be a source of motivation,” he said.

Bailey-Cole, who suffered a Grade 2 hamstring tear on Friday, June 21, during the finals of the SVL/JAAA National Championships at the National Stadium in Kingston, said he has not heard from Mills since the trials and has barely heard from him in recent months.

Little, he said, has been overseeing his preparations over the past few months leading up to the national championships. His frustration boiled over on Thursday and he vented in an angry post on Instagram.

In it, he highlights instances which, he said, demonstrated how he much has been marginalised by the club’s head coach and masseur in recent weeks.

“I decided to go back to my old ways of preparing, which was pool workouts and track. I spoke with my coach (Mills) and masseur about what I wanted to do and they both agreed,” he said in the IG post.

“A week went by (and) I got an email saying that my masseur is withdrawing his services because he cannot work with a particular person, so I told the head coach and he told me that my masseur said he heard I was getting massages from someone else. Bailey-Cole said this was complete nonsense.

“I looked past that and moved on and weeks passed and I noticed I hadn't even seen the head coach at any of my pool or track workout sessions, so I started questioning myself.

“What did I do to deserve this? Why did he give up on me like that, and I get to realize it's because I'm injury prone and I'm a waste of time and that my head is not good but I will keep going until God tells me to stop. “

 

Leighton Levy

Leighton Levy is a journalist with 28 years’ experience covering crime, entertainment, and sports. He joined the staff at SportsMax.TV as a content editor two years ago and is enjoying the experience of developing sports content and new ideas. At SportsMax.tv he is pursuing his true passion - sports.

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