Bangladesh's tour of India in doubt after players announce boycott

By Sports Desk October 21, 2019

Bangladesh's tour of India has been cast into doubt after the nation's players announced a boycott of all cricket activity until demands for improvement of the game in the country are met.

Star all-rounder Shakib Al Hasan was involved in a news conference in which Bangladesh's players issued a list of 11 demands to the Bangladesh Cricket Board (BCB).

They included the reversal of the BCB's decision to disregard the Bangladesh Premier League's franchise-based model.

With the boycott taking place with immediate effect, the National Cricket League - which is currently ongoing - will be the first tournament impacted.

Bangladesh are due to tour India in November, but the players said they will not attend the scheduled training camp until the BCB meet their demands.

The tour is set to start on November 3, with three Twenty20 games planned before two Test matches in Indore and Kolkata.

BCB CEO Nizamudin Chowdhury said a response will be issued once a formal complaint is made.

"We just came to know about it. We will discuss it in the board and try to resolve it as soon as possible," he said.

"I don't think it is anything like revolt. They are yet to tell us anything formally, but we are looking into the matter."

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  • Building an all-time West Indies Championship – Guyana Building an all-time West Indies Championship – Guyana

    A country blessed with elegant batsmen, picking an all-time best Guyana line-up has been the most difficult of all the countries to date.

    While many of the other territories in our all-time West Indies Championship have been blessed with talent throughout, no other country, it seems, has as many talented batsmen on equal footing at the First-Class level.

    That is a good problem for a coach to have and if you were coaching this Guyana outfit, it is hardly likely that you come up against a team who could manage a total your line-up could not overhaul.

    As usual, we welcome your feedback on whether or not we got this Best XI right. Tell us who we should have kept or who we should not have included, leave a comment under the story on Facebook and we can have a good old-fashioned debate.

     

    Guyana’s Best XI

     

     

    Roy Fredericks

    Roy Fredericks significant ability made him a mainstay in the West Indies side, batting first with another Guyanese opener in Steve Camacho before joining forces with Gordon Greenidge. At the First-Class level, Fredericks was a powerful batsman, relishing the challenge of attacking the most fearsome of pace bowlers of which the West Indies had many. Fredericks, a master of the cut and hook shots, was known at the international level for scoring quick 50s but not converting them to centuries. At the First-Class level, this wasn’t true as Fredericks slammed 40 centuries to his 80 half-centuries on his way to 16,384 career runs at a more-than-respectable average of 45.89. Fredericks would play two more innings after announcing his retirement in 1983, slamming 103 against Trinidad and 217 against Jamaica.

     

    First-class career: 1963-1983

    Mat    Inns    NO     Runs    HS     Ave       100s    50s    6s      Ct   

    223     391      34     16384   250    45.89       40      80      177     0

     

     

    Rohan Kanhai (wicketkeeping opener)

    With such a dearth of batting in an all-time Guyana line-up, it is interesting that Rohan Kanhai, a lifelong number-three batsman, would be asked to open and wicketkeep, but a stacked middle-order which could take the batting down to eight or nine without much of a shift in quality means Kanhai gets to face the new ball with Fredericks. At the first-class level, Khanai was absolutely brilliant, scoring 86 centuries and 120 half-centuries in a 23-year-long career. Kanhai’s average of 45.89 after 421 games is no small feat, but more than the runs he accumulated, was the way he did it and when he did it. Kanhai was elegance personified but there was real power too. An ESPN Cricinfo article by noted poet, novelist and columnist in Georgetown, Guyana, Ian McDonald, summed it up best.

    “You could feel it charge the air around him as he walked to the wicket. I do not know quite how to describe it. It was something that kept the heart beating hard with a special sort of excited fear all through a Kanhai innings, as if something marvellous or terrible or even sacred was about to happen.”

     

    First-class career: 1954-1977

    Mat    Inns    NO     Runs     HS     Ave    100s    50s      Ct       St

    421      675     83     29250    256    49.40    86     120       325      7

     

     

    Shivnarine Chanderpaul

    The raw emotion of Fredericks’ batting along with the unequalled grace of Kanhai’s may best be tempered with the obdurate efforts of Shivnarine Chanderpaul. Unorthodox technique and all, Chanderpaul could bat for days without bothering himself too much about scoring and this patience made him into a legend of West Indies cricket. But he could get aggressive too when it called for it. On other days, when he was in the mood like the day he faced 478 deliveries against Jamaica in a Red Stripe Cup game at Sabina Park to score an unbeaten 303, he was impossible to remove from the wicket. That determination and those powers of concentration are a big reason behind his 53.17 average after 385 First-Class games. In all, Chanderpaul would notch a whopping 77 centuries and 144 half-centuries during a career lasting 27 years.

     

    First-class career: 1991-2018

    Mat    Inns    NO     Runs      HS      Ave    100s    50s         

    385      626    108    27545     303*   53.17     77     144               

     

    Basil Butcher

    Very ‘wristy’ was one way to describe Basil Butcher, a batsman who was extremely reliable for both the West Indies and Guyana. His ability to turn deliveries around the ground belied his name, he certainly was no butcher, but rather thrived on the art of batsmanship. He was also notoriously good at blocking out his circumstances and there is a famous story about him opening a letter that told him of his wife’s miscarriage during a match against England at Lord’s. Butcher would go onto the field after reading the letter and while visibly upset, score a match-saving 133. For British Guiana in the first instance, and for Guyana in the second, innings like that became quite a bit of a staple for Butcher. In 169 matches he would score 31 centuries and 54 half-centuries. Australian commentator, without seeing his exploits at the First-Class level, described Butcher as the most difficult of all West Indians to get out. Butcher was also a competent leg spinner, taking 40 wickets in his career at an average of 30.42 and with a strike rate of 54.8.

     

    Mat    Inns    NO     Runs     HS     Ave    100s     50s    

    169      262    29      11628    209*  49.90     31       54   

     

     

    Carl Hooper

    Carl Hooper was a cool customer, rarely ever looking troubled at the crease. At the international level, this proved problematic because he would get out and it was rarely understandable how it happened. At the First-Class level though, those lapses of concentration that led to him ending with a 36.46 average were absent. Hooper scored 69 centuries at the First-Class level and was one of the most prolific West Indies batsmen of all time, more than 23,000 runs at an average of 47.68. He had 104 half-centuries to boot in a career that spanned 21 years. In those 21 years, Hooper also turned his arm over a few times, ending his career with 555 wickets at an average of 35.30.

     

    First-class career (batting): 1984-2004

    Mat    Inns    NO     Runs      HS      Ave      100s    50s         

    339      535     52     23034     236*   47.68       69     104                     

     

    First-class career (bowling): 1984-2004

    Mat    Inns    Balls      Runs      Wkts    BBI     Ave      Econ   SR      5w     10w

    339                46464    19595     555      7/93    35.30    2.53    83.7    18        0

     

     

    Clive Lloyd

    Standing at 6ft 5in, Clive Lloyd was a dominant figure in World Cricket, but as a First-Class cricketer, those 6 feet plus grew to at least 10. Averaging just south of 50, the hard-hitting former West Indies captain was a man for the moment. If you wanted to see Lloyd at his best, put his team in trouble and that would be an almost eventuality. Seventy-nine times Lloyd would pass the three-figure mark including a career-best 242 not out, and he would get to a half-century or more on 172 other occasions.

     

    First-class career: 1963-1986

    Mat    Inns    NO     Runs     HS      Ave    100s    50s         

    490     730      96     31232    242*   49.26     79     172      

     

          

     

    Alvin Kallicharran

    Alvin Kallicharran could play all the shots in the book, but not only that, he could do it with a certain poise and grace almost unparalleled even today. Usually, with the kind of genius Kallicharran displayed, there comes episodes that may hinder that genius. There was none of that for Kallicharran who averaged 43.64 over the course of 505 first-class games. That average had been coming down as well, because Kallicharran, played long past the point where he was still at his best. He holds the record for the highest number of centuries from a Guyanese bat, the figure standing at 87, and 160 half-centuries to boot, with only Clive Lloyd having scored more. He would end his career with 32,650 first-class runs under his belt, again, another record for a Guyanese batsman.

     

    First-class career: 1966-1990

    Mat    Inns    NO     Runs      HS      Ave     100s    50s        

    505      834     86     32650     243*   43.64      87     160           

     

    Colin Croft

    Colin Croft’s modus operandi was aggression and you couldn’t tell if he really meant to kill you after a vicious bouncer whizzed by your ear. With his very noticeable lean to the left side of the wicket, Croft would get the ball to angle towards a right-hander quite sharply before it would straighten off the pitch. That movement with pace and bounce was difficult to navigate for even the most proper of batsmen and only the very talented would survive for too long. In just 121 first-class matches, Croft would claim 428 scalps and some of those wickets were literally scalps, at the incredibly low average of 24.59. His strike rate of 49.3 makes him the most dangerous bowler Guyana has ever produced.

     

    First-class career: 1971-1982

    Mat    Inns     Balls      Wkts   BBI     Ave     Econ   SR       5w     10w

    121     21101   10527    428     8/29    24.59   2.99    49.3     17        1

     

            

    Roger Harper (allrounder)

    With 567 wickets under his belt, Roger Harper is most decidedly a bowling allrounder. His average of 25.97 at a strike rate of 66.7 bares this truth out but he could also bat, having scored 10 centuries and 36 half-centuries in the 200 first-class matches he has played. Harper, like many allrounders, never wanted to be left out of the game and would make his presence felt in the field as well, picking up and throwing down the stumps all in one motion or cutting off a certain boundary. You couldn’t hit it in the air to him either because his buckets for hands would make no mistake. A tall offspinner, Harper turned the ball depending on the pitch he was bowling on but depended more on deception in flight to get him wickets. His height meant he could make a ball look like it was in the air for a long time when it really wasn’t, as well as he could spare in quick yorkers that would leave a batsman strangled for time to get his feet out of the way.

     

    First-class career (batting): 1979-1997

    Mat    Inns    NO     Runs     HS      Ave    100s    50s         

    200      263     43     7480      234    34.00     10      36                      

     

    First-class career (bowling): 1979-1997

    Mat    Balls      Runs      Wkts    BBI     Ave     Econ    SR      5w     10w

    200     37825    14726      567     6/24    25.97   2.33     66.7     28       3

     

     

    Reon King

    Reon King is quite possibly the most underrated bowler in the history of West Indies cricket, especially after fast-bowling royalty, Michael Holding, said he could neither bat, bowl nor field. King only played in 19 Tests for the West Indies but lost a yard of pace largely because of a niggling heel injury. Before that though, King generated good pace through an effortless run-up that some ironically likened to Holding’s. Before his career came to an end though, King managed 95 first-class games and 293 wickets at an average of 27.48. His figures, had he been able to remain fit may have surprised Holding. His 11 five-wicket hauls and one 10-wicket haul suggests he could turn a match.

     

    First-class career: 1995-2007

    Mat    Balls    Runs     wkts   BBI     Ave     Econ   SR     5w     10w

    95      16120   8053      293    7/82    27.48   2.99    55.0    11       1

     

    Lance Gibbs

    Lance Gibbs is the most successful spinner in West Indies history, once holding the world record for most number of wickets in Test cricket history. He was no less of a standout in regional cricket. Generating immense spin with his long fingers, Gibbs was also accurate to a fault. More than a thousand batsmen at the first-class level found him impossible to deal with and his strike rate of 27.22 is proof positive of the danger he posed to them. But Gibbs’ ability to single-handedly turn a match was the real gift the spinner possessed, having taken five wickets in an innings on an unbelievable 50 occasions, and laying claim to ten 10-wicket hauls.

     

    First-class career: 1953-1975

    Mat    Balls    Runs      Wkts   BBI     Ave    Econ   SR      5w    10w

    330     78430  27878     1024   8/37    27.22   2.13   76.5     50     10

  • Coronavirus: SA Rugby and Cricket South Africa get clearance to resume training Coronavirus: SA Rugby and Cricket South Africa get clearance to resume training

    SA Rugby and Cricket South Africa have welcomed the decision for players to be able to return to training as part of revised lockdown regulations in the country. 

    Nathi Mthethwa, minister for sports, arts and culture, announced the changes at a media briefing on Saturday, with non-contact sports cleared to resume both training and playing.  

    As for contact sports, Mthethwa revealed while reporting on the department’s COVID-19 sector relief fund that they will be able to go back in a staggered, controlled manner. 

    All professional teams now have 14 days to submit proposals to explain how they will ensure the safety of players and officials. 

    "This is the news sport has been waiting to hear as it allows us to begin to ramp up preparations for an eventual return to play," said Jurie Roux, CEO of SA Rugby. 

    "We submitted a comprehensive, staged return-to-play protocols document to the department five weeks ago and we are ready to begin medical screening of players immediately. 

    "We will seek further clarity from the department on the application of the guidelines as they apply to contact training. 

    "But this is an opportunity for our players to enhance their lockdown training regimes by increasing their fitness work for an eventual return to play."

    South Africa’s cricketers can also now prepare to resume training again, though no individual will be forced to do so if they are not comfortable with the current situation.

    The updated conditions only apply to the professional game, too.

    "This is a big boost for the operational side of our cricket," commented Cricket South Africa's acting chief executive Jacques Faul.  

    He added: “I have already had discussions with the South African Cricketers' Association (SACA) and I would like to stress that no player, coach, support staff or administrator will be forced to return to training if they are uncomfortable with it at this stage.”

  • Coronavirus: West Indies tour of England agreed 'in principle' Coronavirus: West Indies tour of England agreed 'in principle'

    Cricket West Indies (CWI) has agreed to the Test tour of England "in principle", with players and staff to remain "in a bio-secure environment" for the duration of the series.

    The Windies had originally been due to face England in three Tests, at The Oval, Edgbaston and Lord's, but that series – originally slated to begin next week – was postponed in April amid the coronavirus pandemic.

    However, CWI and the England and Wales Cricket Board (ECB) have been in discussions about the tour taking place in July at Old Trafford and the Rose Bowl, which have hotels attached to the stadiums.

    That would ensure the travelling party can remain at the same location where Tests would be played behind closed doors.

    A statement from CWI said: "CWI's management is now in the process of seeking to put all of the approvals and logistics in place within the Caribbean, including seeking permission from the various national governments to facilitate the movement of players and support staff, using private charter planes and conducting medical screenings and individual COVID-19 testing for all members of the touring party."

    It has been proposed that the West Indies squad would fly to England in the week beginning June 8, a full month before the opening Test.

    On Friday, England named a 55-man squad which will commence group training sessions, subject to government approval.

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