England World Cup winner Peters dies aged 76

By Sports Desk December 21, 2019

Martin Peters, who was part of the England team that won the 1966 World Cup on home soil, has died aged 76.

The midfielder scored England's second in a 4-2 final win over West Germany at Wembley, joining West Ham team-mate Geoff Hurst – who famously grabbed a hat-trick in a thrilling game that went to extra time – on the scoresheet.

Peters had helped the Hammers lift the European Cup Winners' Cup the previous year and spent over a decade with the London club, eventually leaving in 1970 after over 300 appearances.

His departure to Tottenham made transfer history, as he became Britain's first £200,000 player in a deal that also saw Jimmy Greaves move in the opposite direction.

Nicknamed 'The Ghost' for his ability to get into scoring positions unnoticed, Peters lifted the League Cup twice with Spurs, with a UEFA Cup triumph in 1972 sandwiched between those triumphs.

He also played for Norwich City and Sheffield United, where he had a brief spell in charge in 1981, and made 67 appearances for England, scoring 20 goals during his international career.

"It is with profound sadness that we announce that Martin passed away peacefully in his sleep at 4am this morning," a statement from Peters' family, released via West Ham's website on Saturday, read.

"A beloved husband, dad and grandad, and a kind, gentle and private man, we are devastated by his loss but so very proud of all that he achieved and comforted by the many happy memories we shared. 

"We will be making no further comment and kindly ask that the privacy of our family is respected at this extremely difficult time."

Related items

  • Coronavirus: Juve star Dybala details own experience as he continues recovery Coronavirus: Juve star Dybala details own experience as he continues recovery

    Paulo Dybala has revealed the troubling reality of life with coronavirus and insists staying at home is the best way to steer clear of the pandemic.

    The Juventus forward was one of the first notable footballers to confirm he had tested positive for COVID-19, though Dybala is optimistic he has shaken off the illness.

    He and girlfriend Oriana Sabatini have been in self-isolation, and Dybala said both would be re-tested to check if they were now clear.

    The 26-year-old said he would rather experts give advice on how to handle the virus but added: "I always try to give a message of what happened to me, that people take it seriously and that they stay at home."

    Dybala also revealed how Juventus doctors have been in daily contact.

    "All the people here have been very good to us and there are many cases here. I always tell them I'm fine and to try to see the people who really need it," he said.

    Italy has been hit hard by the global health crisis, and Dybala is acutely aware there are many having a worse experience with coronavirus than he and his girlfriend.

    "Well, luckily [we are] much better, these days we do not have any symptoms," he said.

    "I had stronger symptoms, I got tired very quickly, when I wanted to train, I was short of breath after five minutes. There we noticed that something was not right and through the tests the club did we were told that we were positive.

    "From there we had more symptoms, such as cough, tired body and when we slept I felt very cold, but from the club they had told us that we were going to be fine so we had to be calm."

    Dybala said the first concern that you may have coronavirus is particularly difficult.

    "It is a bit psychological, because you feel something and you are already afraid," he said. "I tried to think that it might not be that."

    The couple are trying to make those in Argentina aware of the tough times they may face.

    Dybala did also inject a little levity into his interview, which he gave to the Argentina Football Association's AFA Play service.

    "Oriana and I will need to do the test again to know if is gone or not. And we will know the truth," he said. "I always joke, thinking that it was me who transmitted the virus to her since some of my team-mates of Juventus had it. I am sure it was me."

  • Coronavirus: England players in 'ongoing discussions' with ECB over central contracts Coronavirus: England players in 'ongoing discussions' with ECB over central contracts

    Representatives for England players will continue talks with the England and Wales Cricket Board (ECB) over how to help the game during the coronavirus pandemic, though they have not received any demands from their employers to take a pay cut.

    Having already revealed this week that they will provide a £61million support package to help ease the financial issues caused by the COVID-19 crisis, the ECB announced on Wednesday measures to reduce employee salaries as they aim to protect jobs in the long term.

    Chief executive Tom Harrison has agreed to take a 25 per cent cut, while members of the executive management and team board will see their wages lowered by 20 per cent.

    A report by ESPNcricinfo earlier in the day suggested the England squad had so far declined an invitation to follow suit, though all-rounder Ben Stokes called the story “utter lies" on Twitter.

    In a statement, the Professional Cricketers' Association (PCA) said discussions for both the men's and women's team continue with the ECB over "all aspects of the game", including contracts.

    "Regarding the England players, both men and women, separate and ongoing discussions are taking place between the ECB and the management boards of both the Team England Player Partnership (TEPP) and the England Women's Player Partnership (EWPP), which respectively represent these players," the statement read.

    "Contrary to media speculation in communication this week, the ECB confirmed to centrally contracted players that there would not be any demands placed on England players to take any wage reductions to their central contracts.

    "However, the England men's players through TEPP and the England women's players through EWPP have been and will continue to be in regular communication with the ECB.

    "They will be discussing all aspects of the game that the ECB and the players are currently facing and most importantly how the players can best support their employers, the game and the country in the short, medium and long term. These issues shall also include the wellbeing of the entire cricket family, the playing of the game and the players' contracts."

    Limited-overs captain Eoin Morgan made clear he is “extremely willing to help” amid the global crisis, with the English season not scheduled to start until May 28 at the earliest.

    "In the extremely uncertain times at the moment where nobody seems to have any answers about the actual impact it will have on international cricket, English cricket, county cricket - I'm open to absolutely everything," Morgan said.

    "I'm very aware of how serious the situation is, I'm very aware that everybody will be affected from top to toe within the game and every sport, so I'm open to helping when and where I can."

  • Opinion: Hosts keep missing the point about COVID19 Opinion: Hosts keep missing the point about COVID19

    The hosts of the various big events in the world of sports have been missing the point over and over for the last three months, much like many governments have.

    The COVID-19 Pandemic has inch by inch, ground sports to a halt all over the world and looming events have had to be either cancelled or postponed as it becomes clear that the word ‘pandemic’ is as horrifying as it sounds and the world won’t get over this issue in a few weeks or months as administrators seem to feel.

    But even more important than that, these administrators seem to feel that whether or not an event can go on, depends on the environment at the event.

    But I suggest there is more to it than that.

    The Olympics, for instance, in Tokyo, Japan, seemed to hinge on whether or not the island could get its COVID-19 problems under control before the rest of the world would travel to the event.

    When it became clear that this would not be the case, the event was postponed.

    However, up until that time, even as preparatory events for the Olympics were being cancelled and/or postponed all over the world, the International Olympic Committee had been asking athletes to prepare as if there would still be an event in July of 2020.

    That, I believe, was unfortunate, because it meant, even without travelling to meets all over the world, training was putting athletes at risk of contracting the virus.

    The danger of picking up the virus becomes even more acute when you consider team sports and how much contact it takes to get one working in unison and performing at a high level.

    For that to happen, there needs to be a combination of technical staff, trainers, teammates, and much more. That will up the chances of contracting a virus and therefore it doesn’t matter what is happening at whichever venue in the world, the athletes are at risk.

    I am acutely aware that much planning goes into putting on a large event like the Olympics or the UEFA Champions League, and that there is a lot of money riding on the event going ahead as planned.

    These considerations, I believe, make decisions grey and not as completely black and white like it might from the outside, however, sports and entertainment being the last to get on board with social distancing was, in my mind, slightly callous.

    But that’s just in my mind. These organisers may well have foreseen the financial fallout for the athletes themselves and wanted to save them, for as long as they could, from months without earning in some cases.

    Whichever way you see it, the truth is COVID-19 is likely to bankrupt far more people than it kills.

    Many of the reports on COVID-19 have also indicated that it hurts people with underlying conditions and the elderly, so the athlete with his fitness at the peak of their value, along with usually being under 40, is not in any real danger.

    But how about the person the athletes give it to? And, as was the case of 21-year-old Spanish coach, Francisco Garcia, who knows who has an underlying condition that this virus may attack?

    Garcia, a coach at Atletico Portada Alta, found out he had undiagnosed Leukemia, after being admitted to hospital with coronavirus symptoms. By then, it was too late.

    How I see it is that people and countries can recover from going broke. It happens all the time.

    I’ve never seen anybody recover from being dead.

    Cricket West Indies and the England Cricket Board are entertaining the idea of having a series between the two, scheduled for June, behind closed doors.

    Hopefully, they think better of it in short order.

© 2020 SportsMaxTV All Rights Reserved.