Jamaica mourns as former daCosta Cup player murdered

By October 19, 2019

The Jamaican football fraternity was plunged into mourning earlier this week when a former player from Cornwall College, a dominant team in the country’s rural area schoolboy football competition, the DaCosta Cup was murdered.

Dead is 22-year-old Leonardo Murray,now a customer service representative on the Western side of the island, Montego Bay.

According to reports, Murray was in a vehicle that was sprayed with bullets, killing him and injuring a 36-year-old woman who is set to surivive the attack.

Another former Cornwall College student, Craig Oates, remembers Murray, otherwise known as ‘Nardo’, as a talented player and wondered about somebody killing him.

“It is yet another sad chapter in the life of Montego Bay. It is hard to understand why anyone would kill a promising youngster like this,” said Oates in The Observer, a Jamaican newspaper.

According to eyewitness reports, Murray was in a Toyota Voxy when another vehicle pulled up beside it. A man exited the vehicle and fired a number of rounds before the Voxy drove off and crashed.

The shooter, apparently hopped back into his vehicle and drove away.

The police were called and found Murray and his female companion suffering from gunshot wounds.

The two were rushed to the Cornwall Regional Hospital where Murray was pronounced dead and the woman was admitted in serious condition.

Paul-Andre Walker

Paul-Andre is the Managing Editor at SportsMax.tv. He comes to the role with almost 20 years of experience as journalist. That experience includes all facets of media. He began as a sports Journalist in 2001, quickly moving into radio, where he was an editor before becoming a news editor and then an entertainment editor with one of the biggest media houses in the Caribbean.

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