UFC

UFC 246: Conor McGregor v Donald Cerrone - Tale of the tape

By Sports Desk January 16, 2020

After the mass brawl that marred his loss to Khabib Nurmagomedov and the subsequent ban and retirement, Conor McGregor is back in the UFC.

McGregor will go up against Donald Cerrone in a welterweight fight at UFC 246 in Las Vegas, which he hopes will be the first of three fights in 2020 – the ultimate goal being a rematch with Khabib.

But veteran fighter Cerrone, whose first professional mixed martial arts fight was almost 14 years ago, will be no walk over.

Ahead of the highly anticipated encounter, we look at the tale of the tape.

 

Conor McGregor

Nickname: The Notorious
Age: 31
Height: 175cm
Reach: 188cm
Leg reach: 102cm
Record: 21-4-0
Wins/losses by knockout: 18/0
Wins/losses by submission: 1/4
Wins/losses by decision: 2/0
Last three fights: Khabib Nurmagomedov (L - R4 submission), Eddie Alvarez (W - R2 KO), Nate Diaz (W - majority decision)
Fight night bonuses: Performance of the Night (6), Fight of the Night (2), Knockout of the Night (1)
Career highlight: Becoming the first man to hold titles in two weight classes simultaneously, adding the lightweight belt to his featherweight championship.

Donald Cerrone

Nickname: Cowboy
Age: 36
Height: 185cm
Reach: 185cm
Leg reach: 103cm
Record: 36-13-0, 1NC
Wins/losses by knockout: 10/6
Wins/losses by submission: 17/1
Wins/losses by decision: 9/6
Last three fights: Justin Gaethje (L - R1 KO/TKO), Tony Ferguson (L - R2 TKO), Al Iaquinta (W - R5 unanimous decision)
Fight night bonuses: Performance of the Night (7), Fight of the Night (11), Knockout of the Night (3), Submission of the Night (2)
Career highlight: Becoming the UFC's all-time wins leader by beating Mike Perry at Fight Night Denver in November 2018. He now leads the way with 23.

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