Sloppy Jamaica lose 56-67 to New Zealand in Nations Cup final

By January 26, 2020

Sloppy second-half play from Jamaica’s Sunshine Girls resulted in them losing to New Zealand in the final of the 2020 Vitality Nations Cup at the Copper Box Arena in England on Sunday.

A rash of turnovers, many of them unforced and contact penalties saw the Caribbean side fall away to a 67-56 defeat to the Silver Ferns. This after being even with the winners at half time.

Following a strong opening when they were down 16-15 at the end of the first quarter, Jamaica rallied to win the second quarter 15-14 and go into half-time 30-30.

However, any chance that Jamaica would maintain the intensity in the third quarter went out the window as the Caribbean women were sloppy with the ball, committing turnovers that allowed the Silver Ferns to pull away and win the quarter 19-11 and open up an eight-point lead.

Jamaica made a better fight of it in the fourth quarter but New Zealand’s efficiency kept them at bay as the Silver Ferns outscored Jamaica 18-15.

Jhanielle Fowler was outstanding for Jamaica scoring 46 of her 47 attempts. Shanice Beckford also shot well, scoring 10 of her 11 attempts as her team tried in vain to rally.

Maia Wilson scored 44 of 47 attempts for New Zealand, who were a cut above Jamaica for the second half of the match.

Jamaica committed 30 turnovers during the match to New Zealand’s 21 and like the first time they met in the competition, Jamaica committed 58 penalty contacts to New Zealand’s 26.

Leighton Levy

Leighton Levy is a journalist with 28 years’ experience covering crime, entertainment, and sports. He joined the staff at SportsMax.TV as a content editor two years ago and is enjoying the experience of developing sports content and new ideas. At SportsMax.tv he is pursuing his true passion - sports.

Related items

  • Coronavirus: Australia coach Langer sees merit in games behind closed doors Coronavirus: Australia coach Langer sees merit in games behind closed doors

    Australia coach Justin Langer is open to the idea of playing games behind closed doors once cricket can resume after the coronavirus pandemic.

    Langer watched on as his side emphatically defeated New Zealand in a one-dayer played inside an empty Sydney Cricket Ground last month.

    It was due to be the first of three matches between the trans-Tasman rivals, though the series was cut short due the COVID-19 outbreak as the Black Caps returned home in time to avoid quarantine restrictions.

    While there is no immediate sign of a resumption to the international schedule, staging contests without any supporters could be a viable option in the future.

    "The Australian cricket team are so fortunate to play in front of big crowds every time we play," Langer told BBC Radio 5 Live.

    "But for the love of the game, and for still being able to entertain people through TV sets or radio, then there's value in that (playing behind closed doors).

    "Yes, it's different, but we'll never, ever, ever take for granted how lucky we are, ever again. We are so lucky in what we do."

    Australia are due to play a two-Test series in Bangladesh in June, followed by a limited-overs tour to the United Kingdom that runs into July.

     

  • Coronavirus: Jos Buttler open to two England matches per day when cricket returns Coronavirus: Jos Buttler open to two England matches per day when cricket returns

    Jos Buttler feels players will be open to everything, including two England matches being played in the same day, once cricket returns after the coronavirus pandemic.

    The explosive batsman understands the importance of the revenue generated from international matches and a crowded schedule is likely if planned series' and tournaments in 2020 are to be salvaged.

    Buttler believes players will be flexible in the instance of an intense run of fixtures, even if it meant days where there were multiple matches taking place.

    He also thinks there will be a surge in fan interest after the break in sport, ensuring venues would sell out for games in quick succession.

    "I think we have to be open to absolutely everything," Cricket World Cup winner Buttler said to talkSPORT. "It's so difficult to plan anything because everyone is in limbo with all things going on. 

    "International cricket is going to be vital to the game and the revenue that comes into the game.

    "If we can get any [cricket played], or as much as we can, if that means two games in the same day, then we have to be open to that.

    "Everyone who is really missing their sport, hopefully when this is all over we will all appreciate it even more and want to flock to the grounds to all the different sports to watch the games. 

    "I'm sure you could fill up two grounds if you had two teams playing on the same day."

    Buttler is in the process of auctioning off the shirt he was wearing when he sealed England's historic World Cup final win over New Zealand.

    The 29-year-old was wearing the shirt, which has been signed by his team-mates, when he ran Martin Guptill out to conclude a dramatic Super Over at Lord's last July.

    It will provide much-needed funds for the Royal Brompton and Harefield Hospitals Charity, which launched an emergency appeal to provide life-saving equipment for COVID-19 sufferers.

    The highest bid now stands at £65,800, delighting Buttler, who added: "I'm auctioning off my World Cup shirt and it's obviously gone way better than I thought it would already.

    "It’s an amazing amount of money. The charity that supports the hospitals started an emergency fund to buy emergency equipment they need now because of the increase in patients due to the outbreak.

    "We thought that auctioning the shirt would be a great way to raise money for that."

  • The England shirt weighs heavy - Capello claims Three Lions have mental block The England shirt weighs heavy - Capello claims Three Lions have mental block

    Fabio Capello believes the biennial expectation that England may be able to replicate their 1966 success is harmful to the Three Lions' players at major tournaments.

    England won the World Cup 54 years ago and have suffered heartache at numerous tournaments since, including during Capello's stint between 2007 and 2012.

    The Italian was in charge for the 2010 World Cup, when England crashed to a 4-1 loss to Germany in their last-16 clash.

    "The England shirt weighs heavy," Capello told The Guardian.

    "So much time has passed without winning - '66 is a problem because whenever a World Cup or Euros starts, they think they can do it again. Always, always, always.

    "It's important to play without that weight, with more freedom. A lot is psychology but, honestly, I think the problem England have is they arrive at tournaments tired."

    Capello explained that the competitive nature of the Premier League, which only introduced a mini mid-season break for the first time this season, was the issue.

    "In September, October, November, we had no problem playing the world's best teams," Capello argued.

    "In March, April, so-so. In June, problems. That's why I think it is physical.

    "You play a lot of [club] games and your culture is: fight, fight, fight, never stop, even if you're four down. I liked that."

    Gareth Southgate took England to the World Cup semi-finals two years ago only to suffer defeat at the hands of Croatia after extra time in Russia.

    "My team was a bit old, we didn't have young players and in the past there was tiredness, now they have good young players," Capello added.

    "Harry Kane and Raheem Sterling are important. There's quality, speed, everything. If I have a doubt now, it’s the centre-backs but England have lads who are younger, fresher.

    "You also need confidence and England have that now."

© 2020 SportsMaxTV All Rights Reserved.