Saints go top while Wakefield grab first win

By Sports Desk February 16, 2020

Hull FC's winning start to the Super League season came grinding to a halt in a 32-18 home defeat to St Helens, while Wakefield Trinity picked up their first win of the campaign at the expense of Warrington Wolves.

Saints trailed 6-2 by half-time at KC Stadium courtesy of Carlos Tuimavave scoring a try against the run of play before Marc Sneyd converted, but the visitors stormed into the lead within 10 minutes of the restart as Matthew Costello and Luke Thompson went over in quick succession.

Louie McCarthy-Scarsbrook, James Bentley and Aaron Smith added further scores in a blistering second-half performance from Kristian Woolf's side that rendered tries from Hull's Tuimavave and Jamie Shaul irrelevant as Saints replaced their hosts at the top of the table.

Wakefield's season began with a disappointing defeat at Hull KR but Chris Chester's men bounced back with a home win over Warrington, who led 2-0 at the break after Stefan Ratchford's 38th-minute penalty.

Ryan Hampshire gave Trinity the lead with three well-taken penalties after the restart, and although Ratchford went over and converted to restore Warrington's lead, the game hinged on two minutes that saw Matty Ashurst and Tom Johnstone steam in for tries that Hampshire converted.

The result leaves both sides with two points from their opening trio of games ahead of Trinity's trip to Castleford Tigers and Warrington's clash with struggling Toronto Wolfpack on Friday.

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