Skiing great Marcel Hirscher confirms retirement

By Sports Desk September 04, 2019

Skiing great Marcel Hirscher has announced his retirement at the age of 30.

The Austrian claimed an eighth consecutive FIS Alpine Skiing World Cup overall title in 2018-19 but will not continue his record-breaking career into next season.

Hirscher hinted at the end of last term he was undecided on his future and is now following fellow greats Lindsey Vonn and Aksel Lund Svindal in quitting this year.

Two-time Olympic gold medallist earned 12 small globes at the World Cup as well as his overall crowns, winning six apiece in the slalom and giant slalom.

Only Ingemar Stenmark has more men's World Cup race wins than Hirscher's 67.

"Today is the day on which I will end my active career," Hirscher announced at a news conference.

"The decision is two weeks old. I think it is good the way it is. This feels right."

Hirscher added: "I'm incredibly lucky to be able to sit here with two healthy knees.

"I want to play soccer with my kids, to ride motocross, and I'm glad I can do it now, and I'm fortunate to be healthy and survive my career without major injury.

"It will certainly be a big change, but some projects are waiting for me.

"It will certainly not be easy [being absent for the start of next season], but the beauty is that I can now choose the days to go skiing."

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