Italy's Giro greats pay tribute at Gimondi's final farewell

By Sports Desk August 20, 2019

Italy bid a final farewell to five-time Grand Tour winner Felice Gimondi on Tuesday as his funeral took place in Paladina, near Bergamo.

Gimondi died on Friday at the age of 76. He enjoyed a glittering career that included winning the Tour de France in 1965 in his first year as a professional.

He also claimed the general classification title three times at his home Grand Tour, the Giro d'Italia, and once at the Vuelta a Espana.

Just seven cyclists have won all three events and Gimondi became the second to do so after Jacques Anquetil.

Local media estimated around 2,000 mourners travelled to pay tribute to Gimondi, with some arriving on bicycles.

The funeral was broadcast live on television in Italy and attended by several of Gimondi's peers, according to the newspaper L'Eco di Bergamo, including fellow former Giro winners Franco Balmamion and Gianni Motta.

Paolo Savoldelli, who won the Giro in 2002 and 2005, was also among the mourners, as was 1984 Giro champion Francesco Moser and Giuseppe Saronni, who took the title in 1979 and 1983.

Pastor Monsignor Mansueto Callioni told mourners, according to Gazzetta Dello Sport: "We need to remember to thank him for his victories that instilled courage and pride. [And] for his defeats. He taught us to always fight because in life you can't always win."

Related items

  • Teenage rider Maas unlikely to walk again after Piccolo Lombardia crash Teenage rider Maas unlikely to walk again after Piccolo Lombardia crash

    Team Sunweb's teenage rider Edo Maas is unlikely to walk again after breaking his back following a collision with a car this month.

    The 19-year-old Dutchman was rushed to hospital in Milan after suffering severe injuries in an accident on the descent of the Madonna del Ghisallo during the Piccolo Lombardia.

    Maas underwent multiple operations this week but has lost the feeling in both of his legs.

    A statement from Maas' family said: "Edo is now fully conscious and has been awake for a couple of days, and responds well to family and visiting team-mates. The fractures to his back and the injuries on his face required multiple intensive surgeries over the last week, all of which were successful.

    "Edo is currently processing the diagnosis that the fracture in his back has led to paraplegia, a loss of nerve feeling in his legs. At this moment it remains unlikely that functionality in his legs will ever return, but fighting power and hope prevails.

    "At this stage no further information on Edo's condition is available. We ask to respect Edo and the family's privacy, as they process this difficult news. Another update will be provided when necessary."

  • Froome: Tour de France route is 'brutal' Froome: Tour de France route is 'brutal'

    Chris Froome has described next year's Tour de France route as "brutal" after organisers revealed details of the race on Tuesday.

    With five mountain ranges and only one time trial - on the penultimate stage - the course would seem to suit climbers such as French riders Thibaut Pinot and Julian Alaphilippe, as well as Egan Bernal, Froome's Team INEOS colleague and the reigning champion.

    Froome, who missed the 2019 Tour having suffered fractures to his femur, elbow and ribs in June, noted how tough the 21-stage course was for 2020 while admitting it should suit most of the challengers for the yellow jersey.

    "It's a brutal, brutal course, but good," said four-time Tour de France champion Froome.

    "I think it's going to be a really explosive race and very much in favour of the [best climbers of] mountains. But I think that's great, it gives a lot of opportunities for the general classification to be played out.

    "That's what everyone wants to see, everyone wants to see a big battle between the rivals.

    "For the riders as well, I think it's great because it gives a lot of opportunities to try to make the race and to try to win."

    In Froome's absence last year, defending champion Geraint Thomas was expected to be INEOS' lead rider, but it was Bernal who surprisingly emerged to claim a first title.

    The team could have three Tour champions on the line at the Grand Depart in Nice next June, yet Froome is more concerned with focusing on his fitness before considering his leadership credentials.

    "We've got an amazing line-up, an amazing roster of riders to select from, but nothing is decided yet," Froome said.

    "I have obviously to get myself back to that level before even discussing leadership or anything like that.

    "At least for now everything is going in the right direction, I'm optimistic."

  • Mountains dominate 2020 Tour de France route Mountains dominate 2020 Tour de France route

    Cycling's top climbers appeared to receive a major lift after a mountainous route for the 2020 Tour de France was revealed on Tuesday.

    Riders will be go through the five mountain ranges of the Alps, Pyrenees, Vosges, Jura and Massif Central after the Grand Depart in Nice on June 27.

    They will visit three of France's mountain ranges in the first eight days and will be climbing from as early as day two, with the only time trial coming on the last competitive stage from Lure to La Planche des Belles Filles before the ceremonial ride into Paris.

    There will be no return to the Alpe d'Huez or Mont Ventoux, but the Col de la Madeleine and the Grand Colombier will be tackled.

    The route should suit Thibaut Pinot and Julian Alaphilippe when they attempt to end a long wait for a French rider to win the most prestigious Grand Tour race, which was won by Egan Bernal this year.

    Tour de France director Christian Prudhomme said: "There are 29 mountains, it will be physically challenging throughout.

    "Even the so-called flat stages will be very tough for the pure sprinters. There are traps everywhere along the route."

     

    Route for the 2020 Tour de France

    June 27 - Stage 1: Nice - Nice (156km)

    June 28 - Stage 2: Nice - Nice (187km)

    June 29 - Stage 3: Nice - Sisteron (198km)

    June 30 - Stage 4: Sisteron - Orcieres-Merlette (157km)

    July 1 - Stage 5: Gap - Privas (183km)

    July 2 - Stage 6: Le Teil - Mont Aigoual (191km)

    July 3 - Stage 7: Millau - Lavaur (168km)

    July 4 - Stage 8: Cazeres-sur-Garonne - Loudenvielle (140km)

    July 5 - Stage 9: Pau - Laruns (154km)

    July 6 - Rest day in Charente-Maritime

    July 7 - Stage 10: Ile d'Oleron - Ile de Re (170km)

    July 8 - Stage 11: Chatelaillon-Plage - Poitiers (167km)

    July 9 - Stage 12: Chauvigny - Sarran (218km)

    July 10 - Stage 13: Chatel-Guyon - Puy Mary (191km)

    July 11 - Stage 14: Clermont-Ferrand - Lyon (197km)

    July 12 - Stage 15: Lyon - Grand Colombier (175km)

    July 13 - Rest day in Isere

    July 14 - Stage 16: La Tour-du-Pin - Villard-de-Lans (164km)

    July 15 - Stage 17: Grenoble - Meribel (168km)

    July 16 - Stage 18: Meribel - La Roche-sur-Foron (168km)

    July 17 - Stage 19: Bourg-en-Bresse - Champagnole (160km)

    July 18 - Stage 20: Lure - La Planche des Belles Filles (36km individual time trial)

    July 19 - Stage 21: Mantes-la-Jolie - Paris (122km)

© 2018 SportsMaxTV All Rights Reserved.