MLB

Giants hire Nakken as MLB's first full-time female coach

By Sports Desk January 17, 2020

The San Francisco Giants have hired Alyssa Nakken to their coaching staff, making her the first full-time coach in MLB history.

A former Sacramento State softball player, Nakken was hired along with Mark Hallberg by new Giants manager Gabe Kapler on Thursday.

"In every organisation, environment affects performance, and baseball clubhouses are no different," Kapler said in a release. 

"That's why in addition to assisting the rest of the coaching staff on the field, Mark and Alyssa will focus on fostering a clubhouse culture that promotes high performance through, among other attributes, a deep sense of collaboration and team."

Nakken will hope to help the Giants bounce back from a disappointing 2019 season in which they finished 77-85.

Kapler took over from Bruce Bochy, who led the Giants to three World Series titles in five years from 2010-2014, in November.

Related items

  • 'I'd be f****** irate' – LeBron fumes over Astros sign-stealing scandal 'I'd be f****** irate' – LeBron fumes over Astros sign-stealing scandal

    LeBron James called out MLB commissioner Rob Manfred over the handling of the sign-stealing scandal involving the Houston Astros.

    The Astros were found to have stolen signs of opposition teams en route to winning the 2017 World Series, as well as for part of the 2018 campaign.

    General manager Jeff Luhnow and manager A.J. Hinch were subsequently fired by the team in January after they were initially suspended for the entire 2020 season by the league, while the Boston Red Sox dismissed manager Alex Cora.

    The fallout from the scandal continued on Tuesday after New York Yankees star Aaron Judge labelled the punishment "weak" and NBA icon James weighed in via social media.

    James – a three-time NBA champion and four-time MVP – tweeted: "Listen I know I don't play baseball but I am in Sports and I know if someone cheated me out of winning the title and I found out about it I would be f****** irate! I mean like uncontrollable about what I would/could do!

    "Listen here baseball commissioner listen to your players speaking today about how disgusted, mad, hurt, broken, etc etc about this.

    "Literally the ball is in your court [or should I say field] and you need to fix this for the sake of Sports! #JustMyThoughtsComingFromASportsJunkieRegardlessMyOwnSportIPlay."

    James' comments came after he announced his first children's book will be released in August.

    The 35-year-old – who is also set to feature in the next 'Space Jam' movie – has teamed up with HarperCollins Publishers for the picture book titled 'I Promise'.

    "Books have the ability to teach, inspire, and bring people together. That's why these books, and the opportunity to get children and parents reading together, mean so much to me," James said.

    "Most importantly, we wanted to make sure these stories are ones that every single kid can see themselves in."

  • Aaron Judge slams 'weak' Astros punishment Aaron Judge slams 'weak' Astros punishment

    Aaron Judge believes the punishment handed to the Houston Astros by MLB in the wake of the sign-stealing scandal has been too weak.

    The Astros were found to have stolen signs of opposition teams on the way to winning the championship in 2017, as well as for part of 2018.

    General manager Jeff Luhnow and manager A.J. Hinch were subsequently fired by the team after they were initially suspended, while the Boston Red Sox dismissed manager Alex Cora.

    He had been bench coach for the Astros before leaving to lead the Red Sox to the championship in 2018, with an investigation into Boston ongoing.

    Last week, however, Astros owner Jim Crane claimed the team felt the sign-stealing did not impact the game.

    MLB commissioner Rob Manfred stated in January that the league did not plan to strip either team of their respective championships and Judge, who was part of a New York Yankees team which lost to the Astros in the American League Championship Series (ALCS) in both 2017 and 2019, has been left frustrated.

    "I wasn't a fan of the punishment," Judge told a news conference in relation to Astros players being given immunity in exchange for their testimonies. "I thought it was a little weak for a player-driven scheme."

    "That's how I feel, it wasn't earned playing the game right and fighting to the end," he added when asked if the Astros should be stripped of the title.

    "They weren't competing and we're competitors. The biggest thing about competition is laying it all on the line and whoever is the better player, the better person, comes out on top.

    "You lay it out there and to know another team had an advantage which you can't guard against, I don't feel that's earned. It's not earned."

    The Yankees do not face the Astros until May, when they play a three-game stand in Houston.

    Judge is not the only player to have revealed his disappointment at MLB's punishment, with Atlanta Braves outfielder Nick Markakis also left frustrated.

    "It's anger," Markakis told reporters on Tuesday. "I feel like every single guy over there needs a beating. It's wrong. They're messing with people's careers."

    NBA great LeBron James also weighed in, calling on commissioner Manfred to take on board the comments from the players of opposing teams in regards to the scandal.

  • Red Sox explain Mookie Betts trade: One of the most difficult decisions we have ever had to make Red Sox explain Mookie Betts trade: One of the most difficult decisions we have ever had to make

    Boston Red Sox owner John W. Henry insists the team did not want to trade star player Mookie Betts but feared the cost of his potential departure in free agency.

    In the biggest trade of the MLB offseason, the Red Sox sent four-time All-Star Betts, David Price and cash considerations to the Los Angeles Dodgers in return for Alex Verdugo, Connor Wong and Jeter Downs.

    Betts was the American League MVP in 2018 as Boston won the World Series, and his exit this month sparked outrage among fans.

    But the 27-year-old is due to be an unrestricted free agent next year, and Henry says the Red Sox could not have run the risk of losing the player without getting his trade value.

    The founder of Fenway Sports Group, which also owns Champions League winners Liverpool, compared the trade to that of Nomar Garciaparra in 2004 just months before Boston ended the Curse of the Bambino and won the World Series for the first time since 1918.

    However, Henry also conceded he could understand fans being "disbelieving or angry or sad" as he would have felt similarly had the St Louis Cardinals - the team he supported as a child - traded Hall of Famer Stan Musial.

    Starting a long message to fans, Henry wrote: "I would like to begin by addressing Red Sox fans directly about this offseason. We are used to challenging offseasons, but this one has been particularly challenging.

    "So let me begin by saying that while they've been presented with extraordinary challenges this offseason, those of us sitting here today know that our baseball operations department under Chaim [Bloom] and Brian [O'Halloran]'s leadership has handled these challenges extremely well.

    "We are confident and optimistic while at the same time cognisant of how all these challenges affect you, Red Sox fans."

    He added of the Garciaparra trade: "All of us in the organisation hoped we could avoid ever having to go through something like that again. But most clubs face similar dilemmas from time to time.

    "I understand there is probably little I can say today that will change how you feel about this, but it is my responsibility to try.

    "The baseball organisations we compete against have become much more strategic and thoughtful about how and where they spend their resources in their quest for titles.

    "We cannot shy away from tough decisions required to aggressively compete for World Series. This is what led to this trade."

    Henry's statement concluded: "In today's game, there is a cost to losing a great player to free agency - one that cannot nearly be made up by the draft pick given. We have seen examples of this recently.

    "We at the Red Sox will remember this as one of the toughest, one of the most difficult decisions we have ever had to make. We too love the young man, the great, great smile, the huge heart and the seemingly boundless talent he displayed here.

    "We felt we could not sit on our hands and lose him next offseason without getting value in return to help us on our path forward.

    "We carefully considered the alternative over the last year and made a decision when this opportunity presented itself to acquire substantial, young talent for the years ahead."

    A tumultuous offseason is ending with Ron Roenicke as Boston's interim manager after title-winning manager Alex Cora left the team following the Houston Astros sign-stealing scandal.

© 2020 SportsMaxTV All Rights Reserved.