Paris Saint-Germain have the best attack in world football, according to Pablo Sarabia.

The Ligue 1 champions boast Neymar, Kylian Mbappe, Mauro Icardi and Edinson Cavani in their forward line, while Sarabia and Angel Di Maria provide further creative options.

PSG have scored 35 goals in 16 Ligue 1 matches this season ahead of Sunday's clash with Saint Etienne, and Sarabia does not believe rival clubs can compete.

"For me, we have the best attack in the world," the Spain international told Telefoot. "There is competition at each position."

But despite their dominance of French football, PSG are yet to excel on the European stage in the modern era.

Thomas Tuchel's men topped Champions League Group A ahead of Real Madrid, netting 17 in six games, but they have collapsed in the knockout stage in recent seasons.

Painful defeats to Barcelona and Manchester United occurred before Sarabia joined PSG from Sevilla in June, but he understands the cost of complacency.

"We know we can't relax in any game, not even for 10 minutes," he said. "In this competition, every detail counts."

Liverpool manager Jurgen Klopp has revealed his opposition to suggestions the Champions League should expand in a move that could mean more games for Europe's elite teams.

According to a Daily Mail report, leading Premier League clubs including Liverpool are backing plans that could see the Champions League significantly restructured.

The group stage could grow from a six-match commitment to 10 games per team, the British newspaper said. Such a step could boost earnings potential but also have an impact on existing domestic football schedules.

Klopp's team lead the Premier League, and in the coming week they head to Qatar to compete in the Club World Cup, after earning a place in that event by winning the Champions League.

Injuries are beginning to take a toll at Anfield, with Georginio Wijnaldum joining the casualty list on Saturday when he suffered a muscle problem in the 2-0 win over Watford.

One Liverpool team will face Aston Villa in the EFL Cup on Tuesday, before another plays Monterrey at the Club World Cup a day later.

"The fixtures are like they are. You all like watching us suffering - that's how it is," Klopp said. "You look a little bit concerned, but at the end nobody cares really."

He added: "Today I read an article [saying that] the top clubs want to do more games in the Champions League or whatever. I am not involved in these plans. So that's absolute b******s as well.

"That's how it is. We can talk about everything but we have to cut off games, not be putting more in.

"Until then we have to do what we do and we will do that and we are quite positive about it.

"We need each point we can get because it's a tough and long season. You [the media] can make early judgements... but we can't. We just have to recover and play the next game."

Klopp dismissed the idea his team were off their game against Watford, who had enough chances to win the match rather than leave empty-handed in Nigel Pearson's first game as Hornets manager.

"No, just a difficult game. It was not an off-day," Klopp said. "We scored sensational goals.

"It was just a difficult game and I'm completely fine with that."

Klopp also cast a questioning look at the arrangements in place for FIFA's Club World Cup.

The opening matches have been played at Doha's Jassim Bin Hamad Stadium, but all games from now on will be contested at the city's Khalifa International Stadium, with five fixtures due to be played on the same pitch in five days.

That scenario has come about because FIFA said in early December that the Education City Stadium, which had been due to host Liverpool's semi-final against Monterrey, plus the third-place play-off and final, was not ready in time to stage games at the tournament.

That venue is being built primarily for the 2022 World Cup.

Klopp recognised Liverpool would be going into a warmer climate after their seven-hour flight to the Middle East, but added: "I think it's raining there. Perhaps it doesn't help the pitch - the one pitch we are playing all on ... it's sensationally good organisation - where all the games are on one pitch and it's raining.

"I'm not sure if the people in Qatar are used to a lot of rain. We will see how the pitch will be. That's a bit of a problem."

Maurizio Sarri has challenged his Juventus side to fight against the Champions League hangovers that threaten to derail their bid for a ninth consecutive Serie A title.

Juve have dropped points in four of their 15 league games this season, two of which came immediately after midweek Champions League fixtures.

They drew 1-1 with Lecce in October following a win over Lokomotiv Moscow and were held to a shock 2-2 home draw by Sassuolo this month after beating Atletico Madrid, before losing 3-1 to Lazio a week later.

Those results have left them trailing leaders Inter by two points and Sarri has demanded they do not suffer a similar fate against Udinese on Sunday after the 2-0 win over Bayer Leverkusen that concluded their Group D campaign in midweek.

"The risks of dropping the intensity levels and dropping points after Champions League games is visible in the statistics," he told a media conference. "You can't argue when it happens two or three times.

"We've got to find out why it keeps happening and fix it. There are differences playing in Serie A to the Champions League, but it's not true to say the European opponents are more open. Bayer Leverkusen focus mainly on possession, while Lokomotiv Moscow tend to clam up.

"Perhaps subconsciously our minds can drift to other targets after so many Scudetto titles in a row, but that is something we must absolutely fight against. If we are to be competitive in the Champions League, we need to be competitive in Italy, too."

Udinese are led by caretaker coach Luca Gotti, who was part of Sarri's staff at Chelsea last season.

They have failed to win any of their past four Serie A games, but Sarri is expecting a tough match at the Allianz Stadium.

"Gotti is very talented," he said. "Udinese can transform any long ball into a scoring opportunity, so we've got to be wary of that.

"They are a dangerous team that knows how to close down well and make the game tight. They have strikers who work well and can be dangerous in different circumstances."

Midfielders Adrien Rabiot and Emre Can have struggled for game time this season, with the pair starting only five times between them in Serie A, while Can was omitted from the Champions League squad for the group stage.

Sarri says both can expect to feature against Udinese and has suggested Rabiot – a free transfer following his departure from Paris Saint-Germain during the off-season – has not yet adjusted to life at the club.

"He has struggled to settle into our football, but that is normal," he explained. "He also came off an injury and struggled more in the first half in Germany [against Leverkusen], but he came out towards the end. He is also quite introverted, which doesn't help him to settle.

"Can was immensely disappointed [at being left out of the Champions League squad]. Either Can or Rabiot will certainly play and both of them may well be on the pitch for a portion of the game."

Mattia De Sciglio hopes Juventus draw an English club in the Champions League last 16 after getting a taste of the Premier League two seasons ago.

Juve battled to a 4-3 aggregate victory over Tottenham in the first knockout round in 2017-18 after settling for a 2-2 draw in the opening encounter in Turin.

The Serie A champions eventually lost out to Real Madrid in the quarter-finals and had their hopes dashed by Ajax at the same stage last term.

Maurizio Sarri's men will expect to go further after topping Group D and defender De Sciglio said he now wants to face either of their two possible English opponents, Spurs or Chelsea.

"If you want to get to the end of the competition, sooner or later you have to meet all the strongest opponents," the Italy international told Sky Sport Italia.

"Personally I'd like to play against an English team, like we did two years ago, because it's nice to play against them."

The draw for the last 16 takes place in Nyon on Monday.

Before then, Juve must negotiate Sunday's Serie A home game against struggling Udinese.

The Bianconeri, 2-0 winners at Bayer Leverkusen in midweek, drew with Sassuolo and lost to Lazio in the two fixtures that followed their previous European engagements.

"It's true that we have had some difficulties after Champions League matches, but so far we have lost only once in the league and we are right there, attached to Inter," De Sciglio said.

"Udinese will be another tough game. There are no easy games in Serie A. But if we play like Juve, we will take the three points."

Juve sit two points behind leaders Inter, who visit Fiorentina on Sunday.

Jurgen Klopp engaged in a comical exchange with a Japanese journalist at Friday's news conference, hinting at Takumi Minamino's imminent arrival at Liverpool.

Salzburg star Minamino has been one of the Austrian club's star players over the past year, impressing in the Europa League last season and in the Champions League this term.

Liverpool had been able to take a particularly close look at the Japan international when the two clubs played one another twice in the Champions League group stage, with Minamino again catching the eye against the Reds in their 2-0 win on Tuesday.

Since then, media speculation has claimed Liverpool have already secured a deal to sign the attacking midfielder in January.

Klopp, who was speaking following confirmation of his new four-and-a-half-year contract, would not be drawn on the rumours but took a mischievous tone when a Japanese journalist raised his hand for a question.

"Why are you here?" Klopp quipped, adding: "I think we'll see you more often now."

But instead of asking Klopp about Minamino, the reporter actually queried the German on Shinji Kagawa, the Japanese player he worked with at Borussia Dortmund.

Klopp replied: "Look, he doesn't speak about Minamino, he speaks about Shinji Kagawa!

"I love that, that's great, and smart. I loved working with Shinji, a great experience because I didn't have much of an idea about Japanese football before I met Shinji. We saw him on video and signed him from watching him on video.

"We were not sure about him, but after first time training, in the dressing room, all of the coaches were just hugging each other, [saying], 'Oh my God, we've got a super player'.

"I had two years with Shinji, and you know better than I do, but the attitude of Japanese players is outstanding, smart, technically really good usually, work-rate outstanding, really dynamic and nice people.

"I still try to follow his career – it was just a great experience."

Earlier, Klopp batted away a question relating to the apparently imminent arrival of Minamino, though he did acknowledge rating the 24-year-old highly.

"There's nothing else to say," Klopp remarked. "We speak about it in the moment like we do about all transfers – or potential transfers – when it's sorted, so [I have] nothing to say about it.

"He's a very good player, I can say that, but I saw many good players in the Salzburg team, more than I wanted to see, but that's it."

Jurgen Klopp believes Champions League winners Liverpool are yet to fulfil even half of their potential as the German embarks on the next phase of his long-term plan.

Reds boss Klopp, 52, agreed a two-year contract extension on Friday, tying him to the club until 2024.

The German has had a galvanising effect since taking charge just over four years ago and looks destined to deliver the Premier League leaders their first top-flight title in 30 years.

Liverpool are eight points clear at the summit, have the European Cup in their possession and will only keep on improving, according to their charismatic manager.

"We don't feel we are close [to] the end," Klopp told his club's website after inking the new deal.

"We feel rather we are, maximum, not even halfway where we want to be."

He continued: "We don't think that we are only close to our 100 per cent but we try to come closer and closer and closer.

"That's what we said after the Champions League final, after the first one, after the second one: this is not the final chapter for this team, there are a lot more to write and we want to be really influential in that.

"We don't know where it will lead us to, but in this moment... I don't know the teams before I came in, but it's one of the teams who are most committed to this club and it's really, really nice to be part of that."

Klopp's assistants Peter Krawietz and Pepijn Lijnders have also committed to Liverpool until 2024.

The former Borussia Dortmund boss said negotiations over his future would not have advanced without guarantees for Krawietz and Lijnders.

"Without an agreement from the boys, nothing would have happened," he said.

"That's how it is. It was always like this in my life, that I said first and foremost the assistants have to be happy and then we can talk. That was no different here."

Jurgen Klopp signed a new contract with Liverpool on Friday that keeps him tied down to the European champions for another four-and-a-half years.

The German coach guided the Reds to Champions League success last season and is on course to end the club's long wait for a maiden Premier League crown this term.

Now in his fifth campaign at Anfield, and with potentially at least three more to come, we look at the work Klopp has done so far on Merseyside.


FINAL HEARTACHE CAPS MIXED FIRST SEASON

Liverpool experienced two cup final defeats in Klopp's first campaign at the helm, losing on penalties to Manchester City in the EFL Cup and 3-1 to Sevilla in the Europa League.

Despite falling short on both occasions and enduring largely mixed results in the Premier League - beating City 4-1 away a month before going down 3-0 to Watford - supporters were willing to stay patient.

KLOPP REPAYS LIVERPOOL FAITH

Rewarded with a six-year extension ahead of his first full season at Anfield, Klopp repaid the faith shown in him by guiding the Reds back into the Champions League with a fourth-placed finish in the Premier League.

Liverpool's improving consistency saw them racked up 16 more points in 2016-17 than they had 12 months prior, providing clear evidence that things were on the up.

TOTTENHAM HUMBLING PROVES TURNING POINT

Klopp may be considered a Liverpool legend now, but a 4-1 loss away to Tottenham in October 2017 - making it three wins in their first nine league games in 2017-18 - led to questions being asked of the German.

Results quickly improved, but there was still the feeling Liverpool might be a little fragile at the back until, in January 2018, they spent a then club-record fee on Virgil van Dijk.

While the signings of Sadio Mane and Mohamed Salah thrilled Liverpool fans, this arrival would take them to the next level.

A STEP TOO FAR IN KIEV

Another final for Liverpool, another heartbreaking defeat - even as Van Dijk starred.

A Gareth-Bale inspired Real Madrid came out on top in the 2018 Champions League final, ending a magical run that had seen the Reds produce attacking masterclasses to overcome Porto, Manchester City and Roma en route to the Kiev showpiece.

Having come so close to glory, Klopp again made big moves in the transfer market. In came Brazil international goalkeeper Alisson - replacing final flop Loris Karius - as well as midfield reinforcements in Fabinho, Naby Keita and Xherdan Shaqiri.

REDEMPTION IN MADRID SOFTENS DOMESTIC BLOW

Despite accruing 97 points in 2018-19, Liverpool were remarkably pipped to the Premier League title by Pep Guardiola's City side.

The blow of finishing as runners-up with nearly a century of points was softened three weeks later, however, as goals from Salah and Divock Origi earned Klopp's men a 2-0 win in the Champions League final against Tottenham.

Buoyed by that first major European success in 14 years - and indeed the subsequent victory over Chelsea in the UEFA Super Cup - Liverpool have started 2019-20 in remarkable form and are firmly in contention for a clean sweep of silverware.

Jurgen Klopp is the best manager in world football and would be Liverpool's first-choice candidate if searching for a new boss in 2019, the club's owners Fenway Sports Group (FSG) said following his contract extension.

Liverpool confirmed on Friday that Klopp has signed a new four-and-a-half-year contract to keep him at the club until 2024, as they surge towards an historic first Premier League title.

Klopp joined the Reds in 2015 and quickly began to oversee a steady improvement in their fortunes, reaching two finals in his first year.

Although they fell at the last hurdle on both of those occasions in the EFL Cup and Europa League, two years later Klopp guided Liverpool to a first Champions League final since 2007.

Another final defeat did little to deter them and they lifted European football's biggest prize earlier this year in Madrid, while they are coasting towards a first league title in 30 years having dropped only two points in 16 Premier League matches this term.

Klopp's commitment - which was announced shortly before he was confirmed as the Premier League's Manager of the Month for November - unsurprisingly left FSG's leadership team in triumphant mood.

"We feel this represents one of the big moments of our stewardship of Liverpool so far, as we believe there is no better manager than Jurgen," a statement on behalf of FSG principal owner John Henry, chairman Tom Werner and president Mike Gordon read.

"The decision also keeps with the club's overall strategy of building from a position of strength.

"It means Jurgen will oversee the ongoing transition from Melwood to the new Kirkby training base as the club continues to pursue a vision of being elite in all facets of the industry.

"It also provides us with continuity with the existing football operations management structure, overseen by sporting director Michael Edwards, whose input into the project cannot be overestimated.

"He has been – and will continue to be – as indispensably important as anyone else to the direction of Liverpool. In Jurgen and Michael, we are blessed with world-class leadership.

"This is a collective partnership that has seen the club reach and then re-establish itself as an elite performer at home and abroad.

"Back in 2015, we used the phrase 'ideal fit' when we appointed Jurgen. This continues to apply today and, if anything, the circumstances make it more pertinent. We consider him to be the best there is.

"If Liverpool were looking to appoint the most outstanding, elite manager for our current status today, Jurgen would be the first choice – no question. We believe this deal cements a relationship built on trust and mutual benefit: Jurgen has delivered for LFC, and LFC has delivered for Jurgen.

"Both parties have come to the conclusion that by continuing to work together and build on the work of the last four years, the opportunity exists to maximise each other's potential."

Jurgen Klopp has signed a new two-year contract extension with Liverpool, keeping him on Merseyside until 2024, the club confirmed on Friday.

The German sees the agreement as an indicator of where the club is heading, convinced Liverpool's development will only continue.

"For me, personally, this is a statement of intent, one which is built on my knowledge of what we as a partnership have achieved so far and what is still there for us to achieve," Klopp said.

"When I see the development of the club and the collaborative work that continues to take place, I feel my contribution can only grow.

"People see what happens on the pitch as a measure of our progress and, although it is the best measure, it's not the only measure. I have seen the commitment from ownership through to every aspect and function of the club you can think of.

"When the call came in autumn 2015, I felt we were perfect for each other; if anything, now I feel I underestimated that.

"It is only with a total belief that the collaboration remains totally complementary on both sides that I am able to make this commitment to 2024. If I didn't, I would not be re-signing."

Klopp has overseen a steady improvement since joining the club in 2015, making them top-four regulars again before building from that platform and restoring fans' faith in Liverpool's ability to challenge for major honours.

The Reds were beaten in both the EFL Cup and Europa League finals in the manager's first season, and they have shown immense progress from there.

In 2017-18, Liverpool reached the Champions League final for the first time since 2006-07, although they were defeated 3-1 by Real Madrid.

Klopp's men were not to be deterred and returned the following year, going all the way and winning 2-0 against Tottenham in the final in June, becoming champions of Europe for a sixth time.

And while Liverpool missed out on a maiden Premier League title in 2018-19 - chasing a first top-flight championship since 1989-90 - as they finished a point adrift of champions Manchester City, the Reds are well on course to put that right in 2020.

The European champions sit eight points clear at the top of the league table after 16 games.

Klopp insists all of the focus should not be on him, however, as he paid tribute to sporting director Michael Edwards.

"This club is in such a good place, I couldn't contemplate leaving," he continued. "I must also highlight the role of Michael Edwards in this journey so far.

"His input and collaboration has been just as important as anyone else's in getting us into a position to compete for the game's top titles.

"For anyone in football who aspires to compete in an environment where every element of the organisation is at its very best - from the support of the supporters to the vision of the owners - there can be no better place than this."

Klopp's assistants Peter Krawietz and Pepijn Lijnders have also extended their respective contracts until 2024.

Bayern Munich will be without Kingsley Coman until after the Bundesliga's mid-season break, but the winger suffered no serious damage after sustaining a knee injury against Tottenham.

Coman, who had opened the scoring, went off early in the Champions League encounter at Allianz Arena after appearing to suffer a hyperextension of his left knee while attempting to chase down an errant pass.

Bayern then said Coman had suffered a "capsule tear in the left knee" but a further update from the club on Thursday delivered a more positive update.

The France international is expected to be fit enough to return to action next month, says the club's chief medical officer Hans-Wilhelm Muller-Wohlfahrt.

"Naturally, we were all extremely worried at first. But Kingsley is very lucky," Muller-Wohlfahrt told the club's official website.

"Our tests have shown that he will only miss the next three games and will be back in time to join mid-season training in Doha."

Coman has endured terrible injury problems during his young career, missing three months of action at the start of the season due to ankle ligament damage sustained on the opening weekend.

The attacker previously signalled he would consider early retirement if his injury issues persisted, torn knee ligaments and serious ankle problems having marred his 2016-17 season.

"It was a very difficult year," Coman told TF1. "When I hurt myself, it was the end of the world for me.

"I hope I don't have to relive what I've been through, enough is enough. I will not accept a third operation – it will mean maybe my foot is not made for this level. I will then lead another life, an anonymous life."

Erling Haaland has visited both Borussia Dortmund and RB Leipzig to discuss a potential transfer, Salzburg sporting director Christoph Freund has confirmed.

Haaland has been in sensational form for Salzburg this season, including scoring eight goals in six games in the Champions League group stage.

The 19-year-old has been linked with a number of Europe's biggest clubs, including Manchester United and Liverpool, who Salzburg faced in the Champions League, with Haaland scoring at Anfield.

However, it appears the Bundesliga could be his next destination after Freund revealed Haaland had travelled to meet with two German clubs.

"We are involved in all discussions," Freund told a news conference on Thursday. "Of course, we also knew that Haaland was in Leipzig and Dortmund [on Wednesday].

"Everyone in Salzburg wants the best for him."

Earlier on Thursday, Dortmund sporting director Michael Zorc had refused to be drawn on reports – subsequently confirmed by Freund later on – that Haaland had visited the club.

Haaland, the son of former Leeds United and Manchester City player Alf-Inge, won the Golden Boot at this year's FIFA Under-20 World Cup.

The Norway striker may not be the only Salzburg star to leave the club in the January transfer window; Freund has also confirmed Liverpool are in talks to sign Takumi Minamino.

Manchester City striker Gabriel Jesus has admitted he struggled to cope with the weight of expectation on his shoulders prior to his recent goalscoring run.

Jesus has filled in for injured team-mate Sergio Aguero over the past fortnight and scored a hat-trick in Wednesday's 4-1 Champions League win over Dinamo Zagreb.

That made it five goals in three matches for the Brazil international, who ended an eight-match wait for a goal with a brace against Burnley last week.

Jesus revealed his confidence took a battering during his recent goalless run, but he refused to give up and is pleased to have been rewarded.

"Honestly, last month I was no good and I wasn't happy," he said, quoted by several British newspapers. "I played nine or 10 games, didn't score and I missed chances so I'm not happy with that. 

"When this happens, of course I cannot be happy. Sometimes football is like that. You have to keep working hard and try to score, try to help the team and that's what I have done.

"I cannot talk about other players, I can only talk about me, but when I'm not happy with myself I want to shoot myself in the head because it's difficult for me.

"I take it [personally] of course. I think, 'Oh my God, I have to score, I have to score, I have to score.' When I have the chance, sometimes I miss because I think I put too much pressure on myself.

“In my head it was like that. Always I think, ‘Wow, I have to score’ because I'm playing for a big club in big competitions with big players and it's like I shoot in my head. I say, 'Next game'. 

"Sometimes it can happen that you don't score. It happened with me but I keep working and this month has been a good month for me." 

With Aguero doubtful for Sunday's trip to Arsenal, Jesus acknowledged the pressure is still on to score goals.

The 22-year-old, who made it 101 career goals for Palmeiras, City and Brazil with his treble in Croatia, said: "I try all the time to do my best and sometimes I cannot do it and that's the way. 

"But it's important for me to keep scoring goals because I have to. I'm at a big club and play with big players.

"I'm in a single competition with Sergio - a friendly competition. I hope that when he plays, he scores. I always want him to help the team and his team-mates. 

"When I play he does the same, which is amazing. I have to learn from him because he's scored a lot for the club and throughout his career but I'm happy to reach 101 goals in my career."

Juventus forward Cristiano Ronaldo has targeted a reunion with his former club Real Madrid in the Champions League final.

Ronaldo netted for Juventus in a 2-0 victory over Bayer Leverkusen on Wednesday as they finished their Group D campaign with five wins and a draw.

The Italian champions will be joined in the knockout stages by Group A runners-up Madrid, with whom Ronaldo spent nine memorable years before heading to Turin in 2018.

Madrid are one of five sides Juve could face in the last 16, along with Chelsea, Borussia Dortmund, Lyon and Tottenham, but Ronaldo is hoping to avoid the LaLiga giants for now.

"Real are an extraordinary team, but if you ask me, I'd rather face them later," Ronaldo, who won the Champions League four times with Madrid, told Sky Sport Italia.

"In the final? I would sign up now to meet them in the final."

Ronaldo has scored in three successive matches for Juventus and feels fully over a niggling injury that curtailed his playing time last month.

"I feel good, the physical problems I had have passed," he said. "It was four weeks that I was playing with a little pain, but now I'm fine.

"The team is doing well. We played very well in the second half [against Leverkusen] and are first in the group. Things have improved for me too. I have more confidence and hope to continue like this."

Maurizio Sarri claimed last week that it is not possible to use Ronaldo, Paulo Dybala and Gonzalo Higuain in a front three, with the Juventus head coach instead preferring to rotate.

Ronaldo admitted he likes playing alongside the Argentinian duo but is happy to follow Sarri's plan.

"Whether I play with Dybala or Higuain, it is great," he said.

"I like playing with both of them, we have a lot of fun on the pitch, but the coach is the one who makes the decisions and we must respect them.

"But I can't deny that we have a lot of fun."

Salzburg sporting director Christoph Freund has confirmed Liverpool are in talks to sign midfielder Takumi Minamino.

It was reported on Monday that Jurgen Klopp's side are keen to bring the 24-year-old to Anfield in January after being impressed by his performances in this season's Champions League.

Minamino is said to have a release clause of just £7.25million and apparent interest from rival clubs is said to have pushed Liverpool into making a move.

Speaking on Thursday about the rumours, Freund said: "I can confirm there are currently discussions with Liverpool. It is an honour to have such clubs interested in our players."

Japan international Minamino has scored nine goals and provided 11 assists in 22 appearances in all competitions this season.

He scored in the 4-3 defeat to Liverpool at Anfield in October and posed a threat in the first half of the meeting in Austria this week, which the Reds won 2-0 to confirm their place in the last 16.

Minamino would be eligible to play for the holders in the knockout phase after UEFA scrapped a rule saying no player can appear for two different teams in the competition in the same season.

Manchester United were also linked with the winger, along with Serie A giants Juventus and Roma and Bundesliga sides Borussia Dortmund and RB Leipzig, Salzburg's affiliate club.

Neymar has promised he is "happy" at Paris Saint-Germain and eager to make a big impact in the Champions League knockout rounds.

The Brazil international openly admitted in October that he had wanted to leave the Parc des Princes, just two years after arriving from Barcelona in a record transfer.

PSG supporters booed Neymar earlier in the season, but he has started to make amends by scoring seven times in 10 appearances since returning from injury.

And after playing a starring role in Wednesday's 5-0 win over Galatasaray, Neymar insisted his full focus is on the French champions.

"I'm happy in Paris," he told RMC Sport. "I'm happy when I play football.

"What I like best is being out on the field, no matter where I am. Where there are two posts, a ball and team-mates, I am happy."

Neymar set up two goals and scored another in the thrashing of Galatasaray, while also unselfishly giving Edinson Cavani the chance to score a late penalty.

PSG are in the hat for Monday's last-16 draw and Neymar is hoping to play a bigger part in the knockouts this time around after being plagued by injuries over the past two years.

"It is important for us to still be in the competition come February, and it is very important for me too," said Neymar, who was forced to sit out the last-16 defeat to Manchester United last season.

"I was not there last year and we have to think about the fans and do all we can to be at our best."

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